Patients wearing face masks and personal protective equipment wait on line for COVID-19 testing outside Elmhurst Hospital Center, Friday, March 27, 2020, in New York. The new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms for most people, but for some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness or death. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

It’s becoming more and more clear that college football in some fashion will take place this season.  Potentially, the season will be shortened or start at a later date, but there will be college football.

With that said, there will be tremendous measures to ensure the safety of all fans and participants.  The first and most obvious that college football can take is to require all fans to wear a face mask.

Masks are not only a prevent the spread of infectious diseases, they would also look pretty cool and would be intimidating to an opposing team.  Imagine 60,000 Mountaineer fans at Mylan Puskar Stadium rocking face masks and coonskin caps.

College sports reporter Andy Katz agrees that fans will be required to wear masks.  “I think we’re going to have to have masks in the stadium. I do think it will be required initially,” Katz  said on The Paul Finebaum Show. “I think in September – unless things change, and I hope they change – I’m going to say initially, yes, it will be required for entrance all over the country. That’s just my prediction.”

Although several people – including President Trump – don’t necessarily think that wearing a mask is an important part of minimizing the spread of the virus, but most fans will be willing to take small measures like wearing a mask if that means we’ll have college football.

Alabama Head Coach Nick Saban agrees: “All of us want to make sure we play football this fall.  And to make that happen, we must be sure we stay at home if we have symptoms, wash your hands often, follow all social-distancing guidelines, and please wear a mask anytime you’re around other people.”

This is a simple, common sense measure that will make fans less afraid to attend sporting events and perhaps it will also save some lives.  In fact, when the Mountaineers take the field in Morgantown against Eastern Kentucky on September 12, West Virginia should provide free gold and blue masks for all fans entering the stadium.